Music Federation

They can because they think they canMusic Federation Logo

Literacy

Teaching Reading

Reading across the Federation is taught predominantly through a synthetic, systematic phonics approach. This begins in Early Years, teaching the pupils the sounds of the letters and early decoding and blending skills. They quickly build up a relationship between the written letter and the sound it makes in a word, the beginnings of learning to read.

We also teach pupils to recognise some words by sight, those words that are non-decodable, known as 'tricky' words such as 'said'.

Phonics is taught daily and delivered through fast paced sessions, which are engaging, fun and practical. This continues through school into KS2 and the pupils'  progress is tracked on an individual reading and spelling tracker.
We use a wide variety of Reading schemes which practice phonic, fiction and non-fiction reading skills and plan for opportunities to discuss and analyse texts, answering probing questions and looking at features.

Schemes 
  • Jelly and Bean
  • Oxford Reading Tree
  • Lighthouse
  • Rigby Star
  • Rigby Navigator
We also challenge and extend pupils' reading through providing a breadth of books for 'Free Readers', offering them popular authors such as Robert Swindell, Michael Murpurgo, Roald Dahl
and J. K. Rowling.

As well as this the pupils have access to a good range of non-fiction reading material, appealing both the boys and girls.

LITERACY STRATEGY

MAIN WRITING STRATEGY
A planned writing sequence must be followed that includes these elements:  
  • Some preparation for the sequence through familiarisation with text type
  • Analysis or deconstruction of text, identifying text and sentence level features of model texts;
  • Demonstration writing – teacher models the process and talks through the choices.
  • Shared writing – we all have a go together. Short and sharp
  • Supported writing or drafting  - independent, paired or group, and immediately following the shared writing
  • Independent writing – supporting individuals at the level of need
  • Pupils must know the overarching outcome that they are working towards at the end of the piece of writing, and it must be real, for an audience, and with a purpose.
  • Give opportunities to write every day to build stamina.
  • Teach daily, short, modelled handwriting sessions throughout EYFS2, KS1 and into Upper KS2.
  • Give pupils regular, taught spelling sessions with opportunities to model and apply in the context of real writing.
  • Plan for pupils to write regular book reviews, especially where longer texts are read.
  • Pupils must experience systematic, daily, discrete teaching of phonics from the earliest stage of readiness, with opportunities to practice and apply in the context of guided reading, handwriting and writing.
  • Reading comprehension must be included within Class Guided Reading sessions.
  • Taught comprehension skills must be included in Literacy lessons at least once a week.
  • Reading and imitating is the key to internalising language styles and effects, so reading at home must be promoted and monitored. Pupils on the reading scheme must receive individual support according to needs.
  • Speaking activities should be discrete as well as integral to lessons. Pupils must be encouraged and given plenty of opportunities to use their voices every day, as well as at Show and Tell.
  • KS2 pupils should regularly take part in Drama activities.
  • Speech Therapy must be seen as highly important and given every priority. Oral work must precede any attempts to write.
  • Parents must be engaged in the process throughout and given opportunities to support, train and understand what is required for progress. Leaflets and face to face guidance from school, linked with the work of the Children’s Centre, must be in place.
  • Home / school reading records are essential and pupils must be rewarded for participating well in this strategy.
  • Grammar and punctuation must be taught discreetly and then included as part of a lesson.
  • Pupils must be exposed to correct forms of speech by all adults in school, throughout the day.
  • Constant monitoring for quality and impact is essential, then feed back to pupils and support until skills are consistent and embedded. 


2.      EXPECTATIONS RELATED TO GENERIC TEXTS ACROSS THE PRIMARY AGE RANGE
 
End of Early Years Foundation Stage 
 
Sentence Level
  • To use phonic knowledge to write simple regular words.
  • To begin to form captions and simple sentences, sometimes using punctuation. 

Text Level
  • With support, attempts writing for a range of purposes.
 End of Year 1
 

Sentence Level
  • To construct simple sentences using capital letters and full stops.
  • To use different words to begin sentences.
  • To write the days of the week 

Text Level
  • To be aware of different types of writing and begin to evidence this in their independent writing.

E.g. letter writing – dear, story – one day/once upon time.
  • To be able to use ‘and’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘then’. 

Openers
  • To be able to use ‘The’, ‘My’ and ‘I’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘First’, ‘Then’ and ‘Next’. 
End of Year 2 

Sentence Level
  • To construct sentences consistently using capital letters and full stops.
  • To develop a small selection of openers to begin sentences.
  • To develop a small selection of connectives to extend sentences.
  • To begin to use interesting and appropriate vocabulary for example adjectives, verbs, adverbials.
  • To show awareness of: commas, exclamation marks, question marks and speech marks.

Text Level
  • To produce a simple structured text with a beginning, middle and end.
  • To make simple notes from texts.
  • To begin to write ideas logically grouped together.
  • To be able to write a fiction text.
  • To be able to write a non-fiction text.
  • To be able to use ‘and’, ‘then’, ‘but’ and ‘so’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘because’, ‘if’ and ‘when’.

Openers
  • To be able to use ‘First’, ‘Then’ and ‘Next’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘Soon’, ‘After that’ and ‘Last’. 
End of Year 3 

Sentence Level
  • To construct sentences consistently using capital letters, full stops and commas to separate items in a list.
  • To begin to use exclamation marks, question marks and speech marks.
  • To build on their selection of openers to begin sentences.
  • To build on their selection of connectives to extend sentences.
  • To use interesting and appropriate vocabulary for example adjectives, verbs, adverbials. 

Text Level
  • To produce a structured text with a beginning, middle and end.
  • To group ideas together to begin to form paragraphs.
  • To make notes from texts and produce story boards to support their writing.
  • Create settings, characters and plot
  • Use headings and sub-headings
  • To be able to use ‘because’, ‘if’, ‘although’ and ‘when’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘before’ and ‘after’. 

Openers
  • To be able to use ‘Soon’, ‘After that’ and ‘Last’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘Last time’, ‘Also’, ‘After’ and ‘Another thing’. 
End of Year 4 
 
Sentence Level
  • To construct sentences consistently using capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks.
  • To use speech marks with an increase in accuracy.
  • To begin to use commas to separate ideas within sentences.
  • To select a range of connectives to join ideas together to form compound sentences.
  • To begin to vary the length of sentences.
  • To use adjectives, powerful verbs, adverbs to add impact to sentences.
  • To begin to use correct verb and tense forms. 

Text Level
  • To structure writing with clear opening and closing statements or paragraphs.
  • To begin to organise ideas with related points placed next to each other.
  • To begin to identify the features associated with different types of writing and include these in their writing.
  • To begin to plan independently.
  • To be able to use ‘before’ and ‘after’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘although’, ‘as well as’ and ‘however’.

Openers
  • To be able to use ‘Last time’, ‘Also’, ‘After’ and ‘Another thing’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘Although’, ‘After a while’ and adjectives to open sentences. 
End of Year 5
 
Sentence Level
  • To construct sentences consistently using a developing range of punctuation.
  • To use speech marks to denote speech, and begin to use some other speech punctuation.
  • To begin to use commas to mark clauses.
  • To use an extended range of connectives.
  • To select the length of sentence to create the necessary effect.
  • To begin to collect and use adventurous words.
  • To use the correct verb and tense forms.

Text Level
  • To produce an effective plan to support independent writing.
  • To structure writing into paragraphs with a clear opening and closing.
  • To independently select the features associated with different types of writing and include these in their writing.
  • To be able to use ‘although’, ‘as well as’ and ‘however’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘never the less’, ‘in addition to’ and ‘meanwhile’. 

Openers
  • To be able to use ‘Although’, ‘After a while’ and adjectives to open sentences securely.
  • To experiment with ‘Even if’, ‘Having’ and ‘Despite’. 
End of Year 6
 
Sentence Level
  • To collect and use adventurous words and use them appropriately.
  • To be able to use a full range of punctuation accurately.
  • To be able to use a range of different connectives accurately.
  • To be able to use a range of sentence lengths and types, including simple, compound and complex sentences.
  • To be able to open sentences in a variety of ways.
  • To able to use a reference chain. 

Text Level
  • To be able to use the features of a genre to plan and produce an independent piece of writing.
  • To be able to organise my ideas with a suitable introduction and conclusion.
  • To able to use paragraph hangers.
  • To make sure my ideas and word choices are relevant to the task.
  • To make sure that the audience and purpose of my writing is clear.
  • To be able to create a clear picture in the reader’s mind using elaborate descriptive and technical vocabulary. 

Connectives
  • To be able to use ‘never the less’, ‘in addition to’ and ‘meanwhile’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘although’, ‘despite’, ‘having’, ‘furthermore’ and ‘even though’. 

Openers
  • To be able to use ‘Even if’, ‘Having’ and ‘Despite’ securely.
  • To experiment with ‘Due to’, ‘As’ and ‘It is’. 
3.     KEY OUTCOMES IN EACH GENRE
 
Years 1 and 2
 
Explanation
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write an explanation text using:
  • a clear question to answer.
  • flowcharts or diagrams to show a process.
  • capital letters and full stops. 

Instructions
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write instructions using:
  • bossy verbs to start my instructions.
  • numbers to order my instructions.
  • diagrams and labels to show my instructions.
  • full stops and capital letters for each instruction. 

Recount
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a recount using:
  • the 5 W’s.chronological order.
  • time connectives.
  • full stops and capital letters.

Non Chronological report
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a non-chronological report using:
  • information to help write my report.
  • a title and headings to group my ideas together.
  • some topic words.
  • connectives to join ideas together.
  • full stops and capital letters. Biography

At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a biography using:
  • past tense
  • relevant subject specific vocabulary

Non Fiction
At the end of this unit, we will be able to develop our non-fiction skills using:
  • labels and lists.
  • alphabetical order to sort words.
  • glossaries to understand the meanings of words 

Story
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a story with a familiar setting including:
  • a beginning, which describes the setting and answers the 5 W’s.
  • a middle which describes what is happening.
  • an ending which solves the problem.
  • time connectives to structure my story.
  • capital letters and full stops. 

Traditional Story
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a traditional story including:
  • the key events from the main story.
  • my own character or my own setting.
  • capital letters and full stops. 

KEY OUTCOMES IN EACH GENRE
 
Years 3 and 4
 
Explanation
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write an explanation text using:
  • a clear question to answer.
  • an introduction and closing paragraph.
  • a sequential order.
  • technical vocabulary.
  • connectives to explain.

Instructions
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write instructions using:
  • imperative verbs.
  • adverbs.
  • commas in lists.
  • time connectives.
  • chronological order.
  • bullet points, numbers or diagrams to show logical steps. 

Recount
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a recount using:
  • the 5 W’s included in an introduction.
  • chronological order.
  • time connectives.
  • past tense.
  • thoughts and feelings about the events.
  • closing statement.

Playscript
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a playscript using:
  • description of characters and setting.
  • a new line for a new speaker.
  • stage directions in brackets.
  • a colon following the character’s name.
  • punctuation for effect. 

Non Chronological report
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a non-chronological report using:
  • nots to inform my report.
  • an opening and closing statement.
  • headings and sub-headings.
  • topic specific vocabulary.
  • connectives to join ideas together. 

Biography
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a biography using:
  • chronological order and time connectives.
  • relevant subject-specific vocabulary.
  • past tense.
  • description to gain the reader’s interest.

News Writing
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write for a newspaper using:
  • attention-grabbing headlines.
  • the 5 W’s.
  • a variety of sentence lengths for effect.
  • past tense.
  • paragraphs to group ideas together. 

Letter
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a letter using:
  • organisational features.
  • formal or informal language.
  • feelings and opinions.
  • first person.
  • the appropriate tense throughout. 

Persuasion
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a persuasive text using:
  • an opening and concluding statement.
  • detailed arguments organised into paragraphs.
  • powerful and emotive vocabulary.
  • connectives to extend sentences. 

Story
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a story using:
  • adjectives, powerful verbs and adverbs to describe the characters and the setting.
  • short sentences to speed up the action and longer sentences to describe.
  • the development of characters through speech, actions, feelings and thoughts.
  • a simple plot that includes a beginning, problem and resolution.
  • exclamation and speech marks to create dramatic effect. 

Discussion
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a discussion text using:
  • a clear opener
  • both sides of the argument
  • reasons 
KEY OUTCOMES IN EACH GENRE
 
Years 5 and 6
 
Explanation
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write an explanation text using:
  • a clear question to answer.
  • a clear introduction and summary.
  • a sequential order.
  • technical vocabulary.
  • connectives to explain.
  • sentences that include cause and effect. 

Instructions
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write instructions using:
  • imperative verbs.
  • logical steps.
  • time connectives.
  • chronological order.
  • a clear title and opening statement. 

Recount
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a recount using:
  • the 5 W’s.
  • chronological order.
  • time connectives.
  • past tense.
  • facts and opinions

Playscript
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a playscript using:
  • a variety of sentence lengths, created for effect.
  • colons.
  • stage directions and adverbial phrases.
  • dialogue.
  • actions. 

Non Chronological report
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a non-chronological report using:
  • topic paragraphs to organise information.
  • headings and sub-headings accurately.
  • accurate technical vocabulary.
  • an introduction and summary.
  • research and precise notes about a topic.
  • commas to separate clauses in complex sentences. 

Biography
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a biography text using:
  • paragraph hangers.
  • chronological order and time connectives.
  • relevant subject-specific vocabulary.
  • past tense.
  • complex sentences. 

News Report
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a newspaper report using:
  • attention-grabbing headlines.
  • the 5 W’s.
  • quotes with speech marks.
  • an appropriate tense.
  • a reference chain. 

Letter
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a letter using:
  • formal and informal language.
  • the standard format.
  • feelings and opinions.
  • first person. 

Persuasion
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a persuasive text using:
  • a point of view.
  • reasons and evidence.
  • a rhetorical question.
  • powerful and emotive vocabulary.
  • commas to create complex sentences. 

Story
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a story including:
  • the introduction of two characters.
  • the development of characters through speech, actions, feelings and thoughts.
  • the clear and detailed description of a setting.
  • the sights, sounds, smells, tactile experiences and tastes, when appropriate.
  • a carefully planned plot, including opening, build-up, dilemma and resolution. 

Discussion
At the end of this unit, we will be able to write a discussion text using:
  • facts and opinions.
  • both sides of the argument.
  • reasons and evidence.
  • rhetorical questions.
  • a range of openers. 
READING POLICY
 
The Nature of Reading
 
Reading is a multi-strategy approach to understanding the written word.  It is not simply the decoding of black marks on the page but involves the ability to read and understand a wide range of different texts, including fiction, non-fiction and real world texts such as labels, captions, lists and environmental print.  Competence in reading is the key to independent learning and therefore the teaching of reading should be given a high priority by all staff.  Success in reading has a direct effect on progress in all areas of the curriculum and is crucial in developing children’s self esteem, confidence and motivation.
 
Aims and Objectives
 
General Statement

It is our aim to develop enthusiastic and confident readers who can understand a wide range of texts and read for interest, information and enjoyment. 

Specific Aims
Children should:
  • Develop the ability to read aloud fluently and with expression;
  • Develop the ability to read for meaning;
  • Develop the skills required for the critical reading of texts;
  • Be encouraged to read a wide range of fiction, poetry and non-fiction materials;
  • Be taught cueing strategies for reading including:
  • Phonic (sounding the letters and blending them together);
  • Visual (whole word recognition and analogy with known words);
  • Contextual (use of picture and background knowledge);
  • Grammatical (which words make sense);Be encouraged to listen attentively;
  • Gain awareness of the close links between reading and writing activities. 
The Curriculum 
 
Shared Reading
 
In shared reading the teacher’s role is to make clear what good readers do.  During shared reading the children can access a text which may be challenging to them individually.  Reading skills and strategies should be clearly modelled, and discussion should help children to deepen understanding of the text.  Shared reading should have a specific focus and all abilities should be included in discussions by differentiated questions.
Shared reading should take place within the Literacy Hour and also through the reading of information texts related to other curriculum areas.
 
Guided Reading
 
For guided reading the class is divided into smaller groups of children of similar reading ability. 
The text should be carefully selected at instructional level for the group and plans for each session should reflect a specific teaching focus appropriate to the group.
 
Structure of a Guided Reading Session
 
Book Introduction

This provides the context for the reading.  The adult will activate children’s prior knowledge and/or discuss the main themes of the text, including some prediction of the contents.
 
Strategy Check

Just prior to independent reading the adult guides the children to focus on and apply key strategies while reading independently.
 
Independent Reading

Children will read independently while the adult gives focused attention to support, monitor and assess individuals as they read.  This will inform the target tracker.
 
Returning to the Text

The adult asks questions, promotes discussion and interacts with the children to extend their thinking and develop their responses to the text.
 
Follow Up

(may be developed as a separate session during next silent reading)
An element of the text is used to teach a specific point related to current word or sentence level work.
Older children may be given the next section/chapter of the book to read with questions to think of as they read.
 
Independent Reading
 
Children need to be given the opportunity and encouragement to read independently in order to build confidence, stamina and fluency, as well as develop their experience of a range of books and authors.
From Year 2 onwards there should be timetabled opportunities for periods of silent reading several times a week.  Children should be encouraged to keep a reading record of books which they have read.  In KS2 this will be the child’s responsibility.  In KS1, it will link in with the home/school reading record.
 
Children should have access to a wide range of books including fiction and non-fiction via the school library, class library, Schools’ Library Service and School Book Fairs.
 
Children in KS2 should be encouraged to take home a book from the school, every day.  The books are colour coded according to level of difficulty.  Selecting their own choice of texts is an important part of developing independence.  Selecting texts motivates readers and helps children to develop and discuss their reading preferences.
In KS1 and, where appropriate in KS2, children will be given a reading book at an appropriate level to take home, together with a reading record.  Children’s individual reading will be monitored by staff and supported by classroom assistants.  Each time a child reads, at home or at school, a comment will be written in the reading record.  Where children do not read regularly at home teachers will arrange for them to read individually at school to parent helpers, classroom assistants or older children.
 
Home reading record books will be collected fortnightly and signed by the class teacher to monitor home/school reading.  Rewards will be given for regular reading at home.
Reading should not be seen as just a ‘school activity’.  Wider family involvement supports reading and ensures children have access to reading materials at home.
 
Hearing Books Read Aloud


This builds enthusiasm and enjoyment.  It influences independent reading and tunes children in to book language. Teachers of pupils of all age groups should find time to read aloud to their class on a regular basis.
 
Children Reading Aloud
 
This will be modelled during shared and guided reading and hearing books read aloud.
Children should have the opportunity to read aloud to a variety of audiences, including their own age group, younger children and class assemblies.
 
Reading Environment
 
Classrooms and all school areas should provide a print rich environment.  Reading displays should form a part of that environment – library corners, favourite books, book reviews, book of the week, author displays and collections of books on a similar theme will help to develop enthusiasm.
 
Foundation Stage
 
Reading opportunities are given on a daily basis.  A wide range of approaches are used to provide first hand experiences for the children.  The children are taught in a stimulating environment that is rich in written print.  There are focussed periods within the day when small groups of children share books in a more structured way - i.e guided reading.  The class teachers share big books with the class and regularly read stories and rhymes.
 
The phonic scheme is taught daily.  It covers all the pre requisite skills for reading such as sound identification, sequencing, reproduction and discrimination.
The children are given an individual reading book to take home when they are ready.  This includes children in the Nursery.  The teacher reads with the child and encourages reading to take place at home.
 
Key Stage 1
 
Daily phonics work takes place.  Phonics activities are practical and fun to encourage learning.  During shared and guided reading, phonics work is reinforced in the context of real texts.
 
Key Stage 2
 
Where possible the Writing genre should match the selected reading texts. Pupils in KS2 will access daily phonics, gradually reducing until the sessions are mainly focused on spelling and grammar.
 
Extra Support
 
Programmes such as Early Literacy Support (ELS) in Year 1, Additional Literacy Support (ALS) in Year 3 and Further Literacy Suppport (FLS) in Year 5 will provide extra support for small groups.
 
Where further support is needed programmes such as  the Springboard Reading Scheme will be used.  Consultation with the SENCO is essential to ensure children are placed on programmes appropriate to their needs.
 
Assessment and Recording

 
A whole school approach to assessment and record keeping is used.  This is detailed in the separate Assessment policy.

Parental Involvement

Co-operation and support from parents is paramount if a child is to become a successful and competent reader.  We strive to develop and encourage a strong partnership between home and school.  It is our policy to send reading books home regularly and to encourage parents and carers to contribute to their child’s reading development, welcoming comments in individual reading record book.
 
Parents are invited into school in the autumn term of the Reception year to learn about how reading taught and developed.  Parents will continue to be invited into school to be consulted about any changes with regard to reading.  They are welcomed to work in school using reading activities as a basis.  It is important that teachers and parents regard this process as a valuable means of communication.
 
 SPEAKING AND LISTENING
 
There are four main purposes to this policy:
  • To establish an entitlement for all pupils;
  • To establish expectations for teachers of this subject;
  • To promote continuity and coherence across the school;
  • To state the school’s approaches to this subject in order to promote public   
  • (particularly parents and carers) understanding of the curriculum. Introduction
The importance of speaking and listening to the curriculum 

The ability to speak and listen is fundamental to pupils’ language and social development.  It is an essential tool for all areas of the curriculum, as talk underpins learning and thinking.  It is vital that its significance is recognised by pupils, parents and teachers.  Pupils need to be provided with many and varied contexts for talk, but they also need direct teaching in the skills of speaking and listening.

Strategy for implementation 

Entitlement and curriculum provisionStatutory requirements for En 1: all pupils to develop their knowledge, skills and understanding to include speaking, listening, group discussion and interaction, drama, standard English and language variation. 
 
Speaking and Listening in the National Curriculum and in Relation to the National Literacy Strategy Framework
 
Objectives for speaking and listening are not identified separately in the renewed National Literacy Framework, but the importance of developing oracy is essential if pupils are to become literate.  In line with the expectations of the National Curriculum and the National Literacy Strategy Framework, work in speaking and listening is integrated with reading and writing.
 
‘Good oral work enhances pupils’ understanding of language in both oral and written forms and of the way language can be used to communicate.  It also plays an important part of the process through which pupils read and compose texts.’
National Literacy Strategy: a Framework for Teaching (1998)
 
‘Teaching should ensure that work in speaking and listening, reading and writing is integrated.’
The National Curriculum for England (1999)

The Role of Drama

Drama is included in each year at all stages and pupils participate in a wide range of drama activities.  The renewed National Literacy Strategy recognises the importance of drama and the ways in which it can be used to stimulate writing and to explore characters and situations in pupils’ reading.  Long-term planning should identify opportunities for speaking and listening.

Teaching and Learning 

In order to promote high quality speaking and listening, teachers will:
  • model dialogue, e.g.  turn taking, offering opinions and inviting response;
  • model listening, e.g.  the use of non-verbal communication, respecting, even if disagreeing with, the views of others;
  • model values, e.g.  encouraging the participation of retiring or reticent pupils, praising boys who display sensitivity;
  • model participation, e.g.  recognising the value of being seen as a learner alongside the pupils;
  • provide a wide range of contexts for speaking and listening;
  • support the pupils by providing clear structures for tasks which require the pupils to learn through talk;
  • share roles with the pupils, e.g.  as questioner, the ‘expert’ on a particular topic. 
Pupils have a variety of opportunities to use talk for learning.  These will not occur in every lesson but teachers are expected to incorporate them over a period of time.
 
These are:
  • playing an active role in directing their own learning, e.g.  making decisions about how to approach a task, selecting appropriate resources;
  • engaging in speaking and listening in a variety of groupings and settings, e.g.  reading out loud as an individual and a larger group during shared reading, working collaboratively on an investigation during group work, reporting findings as a newscaster during a plenary session, interviewing people as part of a research project, acting as a guide for a visitor to the school;
  • using language creatively and imaginatively, e.g.  through role-play, hot-seating, storytelling;
  • demonstrating what they know and evaluating their understanding, e.g.  involvement in plenary sessions, use of response partners. 

The learning environment is organised to facilitate talk by:
  • using space effectively, e.g. in the Foundation Stage and at Key Stage 1 by providing listening, role-play and activity areas.  At all key stages, furniture and tables are arranged appropriately, creating displays which are inter-active;
  • providing resources to support speaking and listening, e.g. puppets, tape recorders, headphones/headsets.

Progression and continuity

Foundation Stage

 
Pupils have opportunities to develop and practise their talk through play, to listen attentively and with increasing stamina and discrimination, to respond appropriately and confidently, and to inter-act with others.  This provides a sound foundation for the programme of study for KS1.
 
The school’s programme follows the programmes set out in the EYFS and renewed Framework.  It sets out a framework for planning speaking and listening to show progression from Year 1 to Year 6. 
 
The framework is organised into the following strands:
  • speaking for different audiences;
  • listening and responding;
  • discussion and group interaction;
  • drama activities. 
Key Stage 1
 
At Key Stage 1 pupils have opportunities to speak to a range of audiences: describing incidents from their own experience, retelling and telling real and imagined stories, reading stories and poems aloud, and giving presentations to explain a process or impart information.  They listen to stories and poems, sustaining concentration and participating appropriately, follow teachers’ instructions and express their views about versions of stories on tape and video.  They ask relevant questions of adults and peers, and express their opinion of others’ plays and presentations.  They are taught how to operate in groups, e.g. taking turns to speak, listening to others’ suggestions, allocating tasks and reporting group views to the rest of the class.  While engaged in speaking and listening activities, pupils are introduced to some of the main features of spoken standard English and they are taught how speech varies according to circumstance and audience.
 
In drama the emphasis is on the use of improvisation through role-play as the pupils play inventively and with concentration.  They perform traditional stories and those devised by themselves to peers, and they are involved in the presentation of work from different areas of the curriculum.  When reflecting on their own dramatic activities and the performances of others, e.g. visiting theatre groups, the pupils consider motives, story development and their personal response to the drama.
 
Key Stage 2 (Years 3 & 4)
 
In Years 3 and 4 pupils continue to read stories and poems aloud, both individually and as a larger group, with an increasing emphasis on the use of voice for effect.  There are opportunities to listen to, and participate in, storytelling, and pupils develop their use of talk to explain a model, process or impart information.  Pupils talk in a variety of contexts and reflect on talk, e.g. how it varies for purpose and audience.  When listening to a talk by an adult, an audio/video broadcast or a class discussion, pupils identify main points, ask relevant questions and offer their own opinions.  Group interaction is developed, e.g. agreeing a plan for investigation, identifying and using resources effectively, accommodating different views and looking for consensus.
 
In drama pupils write and perform drama for a range of audiences using scripts, sometimes based on improvisations, to develop events and characters.  Drama is used to explore texts, both fiction and non-fiction, and to focus on key elements of narrative development.  Pupils have many opportunities to act in role, using language appropriate to context, and recognising how the roles in situations can be approached from different viewpoints.  When responding to live and recorded performances, pupils focus on particular themes, characters and ideas, and have the opportunity to compare different types of performance.
 
Key Stage 2 (Years 5 & 6)
 
In Years 5 and 6 pupils have opportunities to give individual talks, conduct interviews, both individually and in groups, and, having presented arguments on matters of concern, participate in whole-class debates.  They consider language variation, standard English and dialect, and identify the features of language used in formal and informal contexts.  They focus on the language of persuasion and identify how words, sounds and images relate to each other in audio and video broadcasts.  Group work is further developed, e.g. identifying next steps for action, modifying plans, achieving compromise, taking on a variety of roles and evaluating the work of the group.
 
In drama the pupils develop scripts based on incidents from novels and poems.  They write for a specific audience and redraft their own scripts created for performance in the light of feedback. Improvisation and working in role are used to explore ways of life in different cultures or historical periods, and themes relating to personal, social and moral development.  In their response to a variety of performances, pupils comment critically on the overall impact, their response to the underlying themes and the use of specific theatrical effects, e.g. gesture, movement, sound and silence.
 
Inclusion
 
Interactive teaching methods are employed to engage all pupils in speaking and listening.  Teachers set appropriate challenges for all pupils.  Where pupils’ attainment falls significantly below the expected levels in speaking and listening for a variety of reasons (e.g. language disorder, acute reticence, hearing impairment) then special provision is made for additional support through guided speaking and listening activities.
 
The contribution of speaking and listening to other aspects of the curriculum
 
Opportunities are provided where:
  • speaking and listening are the focus of the teaching, even though the subject matter may relate to another area of the curriculum, e.g.  organising an interview with an ‘expert’ on acid rain, considering the role of the questioner, the range of questions to ask and the pace of the interview;
  • another subject is the focus of the teaching, but it is planned and organised in order that pupils can reinforce and practise speaking and listening skills, e.g.  working in pairs, prioritising items for inclusion on a charter of pupils’ rights and responsibilities;
  • pupils have opportunities to use talk to investigate, evaluate or report, when another area of the curriculum is the focus for the teaching e.g. demonstrating how an origami book is made.
  • Year 2 to year 6 pupils have the opportunity to work on the school council

Assessment and recording 

All teachers are responsible for assessment.  In partnership with the subject leader and the headteacher they:
  • ensure that some of the key learning objectives selected for assessment purposes in the literacy lesson have a speaking and listening focus;
  • plan for assessments in speaking and listening to be carried out, e.g.  classroom assistant observation of three pupils a week during the shared part of the literacy lesson;
  • pay particular attention to the assessment of pupils with IEPs that relate to improving speaking and listening.

Review

This policy will be reviewed biennially in line with the school’s policy review programme.  The subject leader is responsible for reporting to the Governors about the quality of its implementation and its impact on standards.  In the light of this, policy amendments may be made.